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Viewing 35 posts - 1 through 35 (of 45 total)
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  • taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56
    in reply to: My Intro Video #98221

    How big is the file? If you like we could also add it to the RetroPie-Artwork repository at

    RetroPie Artwork Repo

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56
    in reply to: Control It #98082

    Thanks @herbfargus for adding the link to the repository. My original post had a problem displaying the link I inserted. I fixed it as well.

    Feel free to add the screen to the randomizer project, it may change in the near future though.

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    bumped your issue on GitHub

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    Hi sdbrook,

    thanks for your suggestion. As I stated in the original post I had already tried that though…

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    If you are ok with using a command line tool have a look at:

    https://github.com/sselph/scraper

    Not only will this speed up your scraping but also be independent from your rom folder for the Mega Drive/Genesis.

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    Hi kitchuk,

    thanks for your answer. Not to sound harsh but as I said I have made sure, that it is not my TV producing the lag. Other cores and Limelight in particular show no (noticable) input lag at all.

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    Will try that, thanks gizmo98

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    Just wanted to chime in as I am experiencing this issue as well when adding another emulator on RPi2, latest ES from binary installation.

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    Hi InsecureSpike,

    I think what you are searching for are the files

    emulators.cfg

    in

    /opt/retropie/configs/<name>/

    Every system should have a file like this that lists the available emulators in the form:

    <shortname> = <runcommand>

    it will also have a line

    default = <shortname>

    which is the default emulator that is currently used for this system. You can change it to another <shortname> to change it, that is what the menu script does.

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    The file I mentioned needs root permissions to be changed.

    If you are changing it from a shell (e.g. with nano) you would need to invoke it with sudo:

    cd /etc/
    sudo nano rc.local
    <move cursor to line>
    <add #>
    <CTRL-O>
    <CTRL-X>
    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    Just doing a binary installation will be fine. It will revert your current installation to the latest state using the precompiled binaries. After this you can choose Genesis GX as an emulator by pressing “x” or “m” after starting a rom (if it isn’t default already).

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    The problem in short is, that the autoconfiguration file for the Xbox 360 controller is just not complete IF you use the userspace driver (the one you might have installerd called xboxdrv). It will say the same in the yellow message you talked about.

    If you use the standard kernel driver (xpad) the lights on your controllers will keep flashing but the autoconfiguration is much more complete and correct.

    Could you try not loading the xboxdrv in rc.local by putting a “#” in front of the corresponding line and so commenting it out?

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    You don’t need to copy the es_systems.cfg to your home directory to edit it.

    Emulationstation has a fixed number of places where it looks for the gamelist.xml files (one being the roms folder itself e.g.) In any case though you don’t really have to delete any folders. If all you would like to achieve is not seeing the systems in Emulationstation it suffices to not copy roms to the relevant ROMS directory. Some rare cases (e.g. the home computer emulators) will show in Emulationstation because they have a fake ROM file in the folder (most of the times called Start.txt, if you rename this to Start.dont it won’t show.

    Again, what would you like to do? I am pretty sure you don’t actually need to delete anything.

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    You can either edit the appropriate rom path in /etc/emulationstation/es_systems.cfg or create a symbolic link for the folder you would like to have somewhere else in /home/pi/RetroPie/roms…

    There are more ways but those seem simplest to me for what you would like to do…

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    Just wondering what you were trying to achieve with deleting those folders (which folders exactly?). The ROM folders are chosen as such that Emulationstation will only show the corresponding emulator if roms are present in that folder. What are you trying to do exactly?

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    To me it sounds as if you have mapped the modifier button incorrectly. You can define a button (select for example) that when pressed in conjunction with another button will execute emulator functions like exit, reset, savestate handling etc.

    What version of SNES9x are you using, the standalone or the libretro core? If you are not sure: Do you use RetroPie from the SD card image and have you updated anything at all?

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    The problem is that the default might depend on your installation. Did you install RetroPie using the setup script yourself or did you use the SD image? If you did use the SD image have you updated everyting using “binary install” e.g.?

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    If you have done a fresh install I would suggest that after updating the setup script you do a binary installation (which is then actually an update in your case). Not only will you get lr-snes9x-next as the default SNES emulator, you also will get the updated mechanic to choose emulators per system/rom by pressing “x” or “m” when starting a rom.

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56
    in reply to: N64 Troubles #92363

    Hi dappsy,

    have you tried switching emulators when pressing “x” or “m” shortly after starting a rom?

    If you do another binary install it should revert your mupen64plus to the stable version (I think). That said if you are not sure what other changes might be affecting your installation it might be best to just reflash the SD card if there are not too many changes you would like to keep.

    There are some videos linked from this forum that give more info regarding N64 emulation, although I am not sure if those are completely up to date tbh.

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56
    in reply to: N64 Troubles #92359

    Hi,

    I would suggest you update to the latest binaries first as I detailed in this thread:

    The emulator-specific rom folders will be deprecated soon because it is now possible to choose the emulator used per system (and rom) for that matter. After doing a binary install (which is actually an update in your case) you could try to update the mupen64plus libretro core from source as an individual emulator from the setup script.

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56
    in reply to: Updated Wiki! #92351

    Thank you for taking the time to do this HerbFargus. I think this will be a very good start to expand the content even further to make it easier for new users to get into the project.

    I do have some ideas what else to do with the wiki, would you be open to suggestions and/or help integrating those?

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    Glad to hear everything is working now!

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    Oh, ok, no problem. :)

    You might actually be already ok with using SNES9X Next then as it is said to be a very good choice for SNES emulation!

    Happy to help if I can!

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    Another followup to avoid confusion:

    When you do this, the new default emulator for SNES is lr-snes9x-next. Is there a reason you would like to use PocketSNES? If it isn’t installed per default anymore follow the individual install route as explained before and access the emulator selection menu by pressing “x” or “m” shortly after starting a rom from Emulationstation.

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    Yes, to make it a little clearer with less text ;)

    I would suggest you use the RetroPie Setup script which you can start as explained and then:

    – Update the script itself using the appropriate menu item
    – Reboot (not needed, just to be safe)
    – Execute a binary installation to get the latest binaries and the updated runcommand to select emulators
    – Reboot

    This may already solve your problem. If not:

    – Update the PocketSNES emulator by using the command to update individual emulators and choosing “From Source”

    If this doesn’t solve your problem please report back and I will help you compile a version yourself.

    REMEMBER TO BACKUP :) (since these operations will potentially overwrite changes you made)

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    To follow up on this I just checked the PocketSNES repository and it seems this was fixed, so updating the PocketSNES libretro core from source as described should be all you need to do. No editing of source files necessary…

    That being said, if you are using the SD image 2.6 updating individual emulators will break your installation because a new mechanism was added for choosing emulators per system and rom. To update to this system you will first have to choose “Binary installation” after updating the setup script as described in the above post. This might already give you an up to date PocketSNES.

    In any case BACKUP ANY RELEVANT DATA before doing any of this.

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    OK, sorry, I wasn’t sure about your level of knowledge in terms of the structure behind the project and such. Let me try another approach.

    RetroPie is basically a collection of scripts (automation) to setup a the Raspbian OS on your Pi so that it runs EmulationStation and a couple of emulators (plus a couple of handy enhancements).

    The setup script either installs the emulators via binary distribution (someone else already compiled the source code and you just get the resulting “program”) or source distribution (the script downloads the source code, compiles it, copies the “program” to a folder and deletes the source from your Pi). Either way as a user you actually never “see” the source-code on your Pi because it either never made it there or was deleted after generating the emulator from it.

    What you would have to do is manually getting the source-code you would like to edit (like the setup script does), change it and then compile it. What I was suggesting was mimicking what the setup script does (this is on your Pi in /home/pi/RetroPie-Setup), if you have never had any contact with bash scripts before this might be too much of a hurdle though.

    Is the change you would like to have implemented already don by the authors of PocketSNES? If so it would suffice to just let the setup script compile a new version for you.

    What you would need to do for this, is first update the setup script:

    cd
    cd RetroPie-Setup
    sudo ./retropie_setup.sh
    <Update Script>
    <Reboot>
    

    Then update the PocketSNES emulator from source by executing the setup script like before and choosing to update “individual emulators” and then “from source”.

    Hope this made some sense…

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    Not to be the bad guy here, I just wanted to say that I have read bad things about the Qumox controllers. Most of them seem to be of bad quality and the N64 one especially has the problem, that the analog stick isn’t really an analog stick at all but just mimics the D-Pad (even sending the same signals) and can’t be used for analog input at all. Just check some reviews on the controllers if you’s like confirmation on this…

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    If you update emulators from source, the source code is pulled (downloaded) from the respective GIT repository, compiled, and then deleted afterwards. Only the compiled library is copied to the final destination and that is what you see there.

    I would suggest to look in the respective script for lr-pocketsnes in scriptmodules/… to check for the steps to check out and compile the module yourself. Let me know if you need more info on how to do that.

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    Personally I am currently using an Xbox 360 controller with a wireless PC receiver, mainly because I already had it and it maps to all buttons of the virtual RetroArch controller. The D-Pad on this controller is very wonky though and if you plan to stick to older systems that don’t rely on analog sticks I would go for an SNES controller (I plan to purchase one soon).

    You can either use an original and connect it via a USB converter or the breakout board that is part of the RetroPie project or buy a 3rd party SNES controller with USB built in. These tend to vary in quality though, search the forum for peoples suggestions. I hear the iBuffalos should be a good option.

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    No worries, I have started using RetroPie myself very recently and know that getting the concepts can be hard at first. I’d be happy to help if I can…

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    Hello bismarckdon,

    to hopefully answer some of your questions:

    The Pi completely runs off the SD card, which means once you exchange the card and put another one in it is as if the other card never existed. Nothing for you to uninstall.

    To use RetroPie you have 2 options:

    Either use the RetroPie-Setup script to install all necessary software components inside an existing Raspbian distribution (like you possibly have installed using your NOOBS card), or getting a preinstalled SD card image.

    The latter might be the better option if you are looking for a ready to go solution. You just download the SD card image, write the contents to an SD card and you are ready to boot from it.

    For this you can either use your existing card (replacing the NOOBS image) or get a new one. If you get a new one the size depends on the number and kind of roms you would like to store on the card. I use a 16GB card and this covers the roms I use on the system very well.

    As for storing roms on an external USB device, I think it might be possible, the default rom paths point to a place on the SD card though and you would have to change them. I haven’t done this though, so this should probably be confirmed by someone who has…

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    I have recently had the same problem (figuring out the best choices for emulators for each system). I think it would be great to have some kind of collection in the wiki which lists recommended options (including emulator version) for each platform (Pi and Pi2) and system. I would gladly help working on a list like this, not sure who do talk to about permissions to do this.

    Another possibility would be to just use the default values for the new emulator selection mechanism. I am not sure if those are currently just semi-random or follow a specific pattern. Also those can not be system specific as since the SD card images are built from the same source I think…

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    Which emulator are you trying to install, do you have a version that runs on a Raspberry Pi and what kind of RetroPie are you using (did you install using the script, the SD image, did you update anything to the latest version yet?)

    taalas
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    Hi Buzz,

    thanks for your answer. I replied in the other thread because this is the same problem (which I wasn’t aware of at the time of writing).

Viewing 35 posts - 1 through 35 (of 45 total)